We The People Are Taking Down The Global Power Structure, The Day Of Reckoning Is Upon Us

Ep 2405b – We The People Are Taking Down The Global Power Structure, The Day Of Reckoning Is Upon Us

Ep 2405a – The Movement Has Begun, The Patriots Are Coming For The [CB]s

The push is on to put pressure on the [CB]. People will now start to wake up to the fact that the fiat currency is worthless. The people are now being exposed to a new currency. The [CB]s are in trouble, the Great Reset is in trouble. The [CB] in Myanmar has been taken over, this is just the beginning. The patriots are now pushing the plan forward, the [DS]/MSM have lost, the people see it all and many more are waking up. The global power structure is being dismantled. The day of reckoning is upon us. Trump let everyone know that in the months ahead he has something to share. The DOD put a pic of GW crossing the Delaware, message received. Dan Scavino sends another message.

 

Absolute Proof: Talk Radio Expose featuring General Thomas McInerney

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Inside the Lincoln Project’s ‘toxic’ workplace: Accusations of sexual harassment and a culture of infighting

Amanda Becker
The 19th

This story was published in partnership with The 19th, a nonprofit, nonpartisan newsroom reporting on gender, politics and policy. 

The Lincoln Project’s launch in late 2019 was designed to make a splash.

“We are Republicans, and we want Trump defeated,” four of its co-founders wrote in The New York Times. The organization would go on to raise nearly $90 million for its stated mission of defeating Donald Trump and Trumpism at the ballot box in 2020.

They created attention-grabbing ads that provoked responses from the former president. High-profile liberals such as DreamWorks co-founder David Geffen wrote them six-figure checks. Hundreds of small-dollar donations poured in. Leaders and staff decamped to a preelection headquarters in the ski haven of Park City, Utah, where their effort was chronicled by Hollywood filmmakers. Their plans after the election included leveraging the massive following they gained to build a media empire. They recently launched the platform LPTV.

But as of last week, just three of the Lincoln Project’s eight co-founders remained – Rick Wilson, Reed Galen and Steve Schmidt. Schmidt resigned from the organization’s board late Friday, though he remains affiliated with the organization.

The organization faces a  rapidly escalating controversy over allegations that another of its co-founders, John Weaver, sexually harassed more than a dozen young men, including some working for the project, and over what other members of senior management knew about the claims and when they knew it.

The accusations have roiled the organization, and as its current and former employees and contractors began coming forward to discuss them, they described a workplace where women in key positions were sidelined and where sexist and homophobic language was used by those in leadership posts.

In reporting a story over the past several weeks about the Lincoln Project’s management, culture, finances and handling of the Weaver allegations, The 19th interviewed nearly two dozen people currently or formerly associated with the group or familiar with its operations.

Nearly all of them said they feared speaking publicly about their experiences with the Lincoln Project and its remaining co-founders. Many cited leaders’ tendency to “go nuclear,” as several put it, when faced with internal dynamics that could undermine the public image they cultivated with their liberal fans.

The interviews depict an organization that grew quickly, with little planning at its inception, then began to spiral out of control as its founders quarreled over the organization’s direction, finances, tactics and even who would own the donor data that the project eventually would amass. Some of the co-founders had an informal management agreement that excluded the others, without their knowledge. Several had private firms to which the Lincoln Project channeled tens of millions of dollars that were then not subject to disclosure, while others were paid relatively modest amounts directly or nothing at all. There were clashes over ego and resentments over podcasts and television contracts.

The Lincoln Project began in late 2019 with eight co-founders. By late February 2020, six remained with the group: Steve Schmidt, Rick Wilson, Jennifer Horn, Reed Galen, Mike Madrid and Ron Steslow. As of last week, there were three.

Lincoln Project co-founders (left to right) Ron Steslow, Mike Madrid, Jennifer Horn, Reed Galen, Rick Wilson, and Steve Schmidt on Election Day, Nov. 3, 2020, in Park City, Utah.

The Lincoln Project’s founders were some of the highest-profile players in Republican politics before they rejected Trump and became apostates within their own party. There was George Conway, a high-profile conservative lawyer who is married to Kellyanne Conway, who was a top adviser to Trump. Weaver worked on Sen. John McCain’s presidential campaigns, as did Galen and Schmidt. Mike Madrid is a strategist specializing in Latino voting trends. Jennifer Horn is a former GOP chair in New Hampshire. Wilson worked on Rudy Giuliani’s mayoral and Senate campaigns. Ron Steslow started his own consulting firm after working at the National Republican Senatorial Committee.

Conway was the first to leave in August, citing family obligations. Weaver took medical leave around the same time.

A three-person board – Galen, Madrid and Steslow – was created without input from some of the other co-founders. Eventually, disputes over that board, and its scope, led to bitter infighting that involved individual co-founders lawyering up and threatening one another with “oppo” research, Washington-speak for the type of negative information amassed by a political campaign or organization to use against a rival.

In late 2020, Conway stepped in to help mediate what was quickly becoming a civil war within the organization. Madrid and Steslow departed in December after signing nondisclosure agreements and receiving separation packages that those familiar with the negotiations describe as lucrative.

Group’s super PAC status makes tracking spending difficult

On Dec. 21, the Lincoln Project paid Madrid’s firm, Grassroots Lab, two round-sum payments of $1.1 million and $300,000. On the same date, it paid Steslow’s firm, TUSK Digital, $900,000. All of the payments were described as for “political strategy consulting” on campaign finance filings.

The Lincoln Project was organized as a super PAC, meaning it could raise and spend unlimited sums of money but had to disclose only basic details about where the money was going. The firms that some of the co-founders brought with them to the Lincoln Project’s work became a source of internal frustration as more than half of the nearly $90 million raised by the project flowed to firms controlled by its various founders. Once it was there, there was usually no way to track how they spent or kept it.

As of late January, Galen’s firm, Summit Strategic Communications, had received roughly $27.5 million from the Lincoln Project, with the bulk of that going to “independent expenditures” such as television or internet advertisements and nearly $7 million to consulting. Steslow’s firm, TUSK, received $22.4 million, with $7.1 million for consulting.

Schmidt’s firm, SES Strategies, received $1.5 million for consulting, but he told the Chicago Tribune he returned it. Madrid’s Grassroots Lab received nearly $2.2 million for consulting services. The Lincoln Project paid Horn directly in amounts of $5,000 or $10,000 a month, campaign finance filings show. In the fall, she began receiving additional payments from LPTV, but in all, her annual compensation was about $150,000, sources familiar with the situation said.

There is no way to determine what portion of the consulting fees went directly to the co-founders as their compensation for Lincoln Project work or whether they paid one another, according to campaign finance experts. Super PACs are structured that way by design.

Super PACs are widely used by both political parties, but the percentage of the Lincoln Project’s money that went to vendors and firms connected to its co-founders raised eyebrows given the group’s criticism of Trump-affiliated political groups that similarly directed money to the organizations of allies as a “criminal enterprise.”

Another point of internal financial contention was the donor information that Lincoln Project amassed with ads that spread across social media. The specifics over who or which entity would own the data was not negotiated in advance, sources said, and the data’s market value grew as more people gave.

A frequent quip from Schmidt overheard by multiple people was that the Lincoln Project was his vehicle to achieve “generational wealth.”

Sexist, homophobic language cited in a toxic workplace

As senior management squabbled over how to divide the pieces of the project’s financial pie, dissatisfaction was growing within the organization’s more junior ranks, which were made up of largely young and liberal staffers who said they had different standards from some of the group’s leaders, citing Schmidt and Wilson specifically. There was language used in both the Lincoln Project’s ads and within its workplace about gender and sexuality that made many of them uncomfortable, the dozens of interviews revealed.

Young men were “wizards” while young women were “girls.” Political rivals were referred to using crude sexual and homophobic slurs. By the time the staff convened in Park City, the situation had become so “toxic,” according to more than a dozen accounts, that at least two co-founders, neither of whom remain at the project, had tried to intervene to improve working conditions.

Staff had also complained that some of the project’s ads, specifically some related to Ivanka Trump, were sexist.

Plans to sue:Ivanka Trump, Jared Kusher threaten to sue over Lincoln Project Times Square billboards

There was dissatisfaction among the ranks when Ben Howe, billed as the wunderkind behind some of the Lincoln Project’s earliest ads, was brought back by Wilson. Howe had been fired after The 19th reported that in a series of tweets, he had used offensive slang for female anatomy to insult political rivals.

Lincoln Project women were treated differently from men

There were few women in Lincoln Project’s leadership, and those who were there were treated differently from the men, multiple people said. Horn was left out of meetings and not consulted about key decisions or public statements. At points, others within the organization had to persuade her not to quit.

On Thursday night, the Lincoln Project tweeted out private direct messages on the social media platform between Horn, who left the organization the previous week, and this reporter.

Jennifer Horn, a co-founder of The Lincoln Project, says one of the reasons she broke ties with the group was the way it handled sexual harassment allegations against John Weaver and how she was treated when she raised the issue.

Horn had just provided a lengthy statement to The New York Times on the specifics of her departure, citing the remaining co-founders’ handling of the allegations against Weaver and saying that when she raised her concerns, she was “yelled at, demeaned and lied to.”

The Lincoln Project had the week before released a statement about Horn’s departure – it had not done so for Madrid or Steslow – that said the organization had parted ways with Horn over a compensation dispute after she asked for a “signing bonus” of $250,000 to remain with the group for its post-election work, along with a $40,000-a-month consulting contract.

Horn, who was in the middle of negotiating a post-election employment contract, has not denied the specifics. She said her departure was not about compensation but a request to address sexual harassment that was “rejected outright.”

Some of Horn’s allies with ties to the Lincoln Project reached out to The 19th at that time, wanting to discuss the group’s treatment of her specifically and women generally.

The screenshots shared Thursday night by the Lincoln Project, one of which was reshared by Wilson from his personal account, were of Horn’s inbox on the social media platform. She said she had neither provided the images to the Lincoln Project nor had she given anyone permission to access her account. The tweets were deleted after Conway said publicly that the move “looks on its face to be a violation of federal law” and urged their removal.

The Lincoln Project’s sharing of Horn’s private messages came shortly after The 19th had reached out to the group’s spokesperson, Kurt Bardella, as well as Wilson, Schmidt and Galen, with a list of more than 20 specifics about the group’s management, finances and handling of the Weaver allegations, drawn from publicly available government records and the interviews it intended to publish in a forthcoming story.

Bardella said Friday that he was no longer with the Lincoln Project, effective immediately. Wilson, Schmidt and Galen did not directly respond to any of the points laid out by The 19th.

Spotlight shines on allegations of Weaver harassing young men

New attention has been drawn to the Lincoln Project in the wake of allegations about Weaver.

Sources familiar with internal communications said that in June, multiple members of the Lincoln Project’s senior leadership team were told in conversations and in writing about allegations that Weaver had sexually harassed young men, including some who were working for the organization.

By August, nearly all of the co-founders still with the project were aware and a media plan was being crafted after the group’s employees and contractors were contacted by a news outlet working on a story about the allegations. By the time staff gathered in Park City for the buildup to the election, the accusations were an open secret even among junior staff, sources said.

Lincoln Project co-founder John Weaver is accused of sexually harassing at least 10 young men, including two of the group's employees.

The first allegations were published in January, first in the American Conservative and later in other publications, including The New York Times. Schmidt told The Times that senior management was not aware until that month. Schmidt’s timeline conflicts with that offered by more than a dozen sources who worked within and as contractors for the group at various times.

In the past few days, multiple news outlets have published articles laying out more extensive accusations against Weaver, as well as allegations that they were known earlier than previously reported. Schmidt has run point on responding to the reporting.

He told The Associated Press on Wednesday that no Lincoln Project employee, intern or contractor ever made an allegation so serious it would have triggered an investigation by an independent investigator. He provided the same statement to New York Magazine on Thursday. By Thursday night, the Lincoln Project announced it would hire a “best-in-class outside professional” to investigate the matter.

Calls to release staffers from nondisclosure agreements

Who knew how much and when, and who can say what, is now dominating the back-and-forth between those who remain at the Lincoln Project and those who have left.

When Ryan Girdusky first wrote about the allegations for the American Conservative magazine, he told The 19th it was a “constant problem of finding someone willing to come out and make allegations, go on the record, and within 48 hours, out of fear for their future, would drop out of the story. It happened for months on end.”

Conway and Horn, who said she was not aware of severity of the allegations against Weaver until The New York Times published its story in January, have called for the Lincoln Project’s current and former staff to be released from their nondisclosure agreements.

The group’s remaining leaders said Thursday night that anyone who wants to be released from their nondisclosure agreements to discuss allegations against Weaver should reach out to them directly. Six individuals told The New York Times that they did not feel comfortable doing so, citing Horn’s treatment and Schmidt’s statements about when he first learned of the allegations.

Steslow’s lawyer sent the Lincoln Project a letter late Thursday asking that he be released from the nondisclosure agreement he signed at the time of his departure, a spokesperson said.

“Any time there is an imbalance of power in a relationship, the weaker person becomes vulnerable to abuse. The stronger, more influential person has an obligation to conduct themselves with honor and integrity in order to preserve the dignity and autonomy of all involved,” Horn said in the statement Thursday night.

“Victims deserve to be  – and must be – heard,” she added.

Why did the Church Murder the Cathars?

The Cathars are among the great burn victims of history. Their beliefs were an early History-of-Catharism-and-the-Albigensian-Crusade (2)form of Christianity originating in the East, and opposed a dogmatic, coercive Catholic Church.  They were exterminated by burning at the stake on huge pyres. Catharism designates a religious movement of Christian origin dating from the late 12th century. Its followers were particularly numerous in Occitania, southern France. The Cathar vision of the universe was dualist: light and the spirit, good,  confronting matter and darkness,  evil. This belief led them to follow an ascetic way of life. Considered as heretics, the Cathars were decimated  by the the Albigensian crusade, initiated by Pope Innocent III. The most well-known burnings were those of Minerve in 1208 and Montségur in 1244. So why so much brutality by the Catholic Church?

The Cathar theology was essentially Gnostic in nature. The gnostics were religious cathars_origmystics who proclaimed gnosis, knowledge, as the way of salvation. To know oneself truly allowed gnostic men and women to know god directly, without any need for the mediation of rabbis, priests, bishops,  or other religious officials.

Cathar practices were often in direct contradiction to how the Catholic Church conducted business, especially with regards to the issues of poverty and the moral character of priests. The so-called Cathar heretic-1heresy was a major challenge to the Roman Catholic Church in the 12th century. Heresy is a belief or opinion contrary to orthodox religious doctrine in the Christian religion. The English word heresy comes from the Greek word hairesis,  which meant “school of thought,” “sect,” or “faction.” It originally did not have negative connotation. I would be considered a heretic today because my beliefs are contrary to the Christians beliefs.

Cathar beliefs included recognition of the feminine principle of the divine. God was both man and woman with the female aspect of God was Sophia, “wisdom” encouraged 4ed2d18b64d10ea71b4366313a42f49c--santa-sophia-triple-goddessequality of the sexes in Cathar communities.  Gnostics also sought knowledge and wisdom from many different sources, and they accepted insight wherever it could be found. Like those who came before them, they embraced a personified wisdom, Sophia, understood variously and taken as the manifestation of divine insight.

Cathars also believed in Reincarnation. A soul would be continually reborn until it renounced the world completely and escaped incarnation. 

The also believed in Cosmic Duality,   meaning the the existence of two powerful deities in the universe, one good and one evil,  positive and negative, who were in a constant in conflict. The purpose of life was to serve 33a935279924723a667cdc080ca2ea6athe good by serving others and escape from the cycle of rebirth and death to return home to God, much like the Gnostics. 

The cathars were also vegetarians and everyone worked and believed in manual labor including their priest. Celibacy was also encouraged generally since it was thought that every person born was just another poor soul trapped by the devil in a body. Marriage overall was discouraged. 

The only books of the New Testament they accepted were the gospels, completely rejecting the epistles of Paul and the others, with a special emphasis on the Gospel According to John.

The Cathars lived in communities which varied in size from 60 to 600 individuals. They f.76.rappear in small numbers in records from the 1140’s CE in France, but by 1167 CE, there were enough communities in the region to require an assembly to set rules and boundaries. They were non-violence, forbidden to kill, to make war, to lie and to swear. Life was purely spiritual and the body was totally despised. Within the church, a hierarchy existed between two categories of the faithful. The had followers or believers.  The priests or preaching brothers were  known as Parfaits, Perfecti, the perfect ones, or “bonshommes”, good men, good women. They wore a hooded black robe girded at the waist and the men were often bearded. They preached disobedience to the Roman clergy.

Robert-Bougre-Heretics-800x445Because of this and their doctrines,  Cathars were regarded as heretics. Methods of execution according to the situation and the crime. Robbers were punished by hanging, while noblemen were beheaded by the sword and the common people by the axe. Death by stoning was the punishment for adultery.  Punishment by fire could also take the form of roasting to death and burning on a gridiron.  But death by burning at the stake, an ancient tradition, was reserved for heretics. Punishment by fire was already used in earlier times, before Jesus Christ, and ranked high among the violent methods of execution. But it was in the Middleimage018 Ages, with the Inquisition, that widespread use was made of the great bonfires which made it possible to eliminate the Cathars “en masse”.

Because the Cathars were heretics,  they had to be burnt. The smallest trace of “sin” had to be extirpated, the corrupt body had to be destroyed and evil exorcised in the flames. Even corpses were disinterred and burnt if the deceased were suspected of being a heretics. Burning inflicted a double punishment, both temporal and spiritual, since the Cathar church considered that burial of a body was a necessary condition for resurrection.

In 1208 CE, Pope Innocent III sent the lawyer-monk Pierre de Castelnau to Southern France to enlist the aid of Raymond VI, Count of Toulouse  in suppressing the heresy by murder. According to Church documents, 20,000 heretics were slaughtered in and arnaud-amalric-a4c9ee59-adc0-4087-bcec-21b230a930f-resize-750around Beziers and the town burned to the ground, majority  being  women and children.

Reformation was fuelled by the preserved ideas of the Cathars and their fellow “heretics.  As an organized religious sect, Catharism was eliminated during the churches purge of heretics in Southern France but continued as a living faith. There are even Cathars alive today, or at least people claiming to be modern Cathars. Reformers seem to have known things that the Cathars knew, and even today, some Protestant Churches claim a Cathar heritage.

Catharism may have been the survival of Gnosticism, the most fascinating and perplexing phenomena in Western religious history.  Orthodox Christianity also tried to 6271-lec8-1536x865eliminate the Gnostics as heretics as well. Because scholars had to depend on writings of opponents of the Gnostics and other so-called heretical groups, there was no real understanding of their beliefs.  However in 1945, one of the greatest discoveries of the century was made when a collection of thirteen ancient books, called “codices”, containing over fifty texts was found in caves. A large number Gnostic texts were found and thought to have been entirely destroyed during the early Christian struggle to define “orthodoxy” in the 2nd and 3rd centuries. 

One discovery was the Gospel of Thomas, 114  Secret sayings of Jesus. Many of the saying can be found in the New testament and many others are very Gnostic in nature. The first saying Jesus tells us,  “Whoever finds the meaning of these words will not taste death.”

Perhaps this is what the church was concerned about. To truly find God we do not need the church but look within as Jesus was trying to tell  us in Saying three: If those who lead you say to you: See, the kingdom is in heaven, then the birds of the heaven will go before you; if they say to you: It is in the sea, then the fish will go before you. But the kingdom is within you, and it is outside of you. When you know yourselves, then you will be known, and you will know that you are the sons of the living Father. But if you do not know yourselves, then you are in poverty, and you are poverty.