Out of Shadows; Herbs and Spices Can Help Protect Against EMFs

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Herbs and Spices Can Help Protect Against EMFs

How to build resilience by harnessing the power of herbs and spices
Dec 5 2022

 

Our exposure to man-made radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) has increased dramatically in recent decades. From mobile phones and laptops to Wi-Fi access points, routers, smart meters, antennas on cell towers, Bluetooth devices, and cordless phones, it’s becoming nearly impossible to avoid man-made EMFs.

While government and industry assure us that near-constant exposure to these sources of radiation is safe, the current established standards of exposure to EMFs are based largely on the thermal effects. However, the most damaging component is likely nonthermal, direct tissue penetration.

The potential long-term health effects of low-dose exposure to EMFs were scarcely investigated prior to the mass introduction of these technologies. A 2009 study published in Pathophysiology reported that long-term exposure to EMFs “increase the risk of both Alzheimer’s disease and breast cancer.”

Specifically, EMFs can penetrate tissues and decrease the production of melatonin, which may contribute to the development or progression of Alzheimer’s disease and breast cancer.

EMFs may also affect fertility in both men and women. A study published in the Central European Journal of Urology in 2014 tested sperm motility and DNA fragmentation in sperm samples from healthy men following exposure to a cell phone in “talk mode” for five hours. Compared with the control group, mobile phone radiation exposure decreased sperm motility and increased DNA fragmentation levels.

In 2017, a prospective cohort study of 913 pregnant women published in Scientific Reports concluded that women who were exposed to higher amounts of EMF radiation had 2.72 times the risk of miscarriage compared to women with lower EMF exposure.

“This study provides fresh evidence, directly from a human population, that MF [magnetic field] non-ionizing radiation could have adverse biological impacts on human health,” the authors wrote.

EMFs have also been reported to increase the production of free radicals and reactive oxygen species leading to increased oxidative stress. Recent studies have concluded that oxidative stress plays a major role in the etiology of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, aging, cancer, and brain dysfunction. Consequently, it’s plausible that long-term exposure to EMFs may contribute to the formation of chronic disease.

For instance, based on the increased risk for brain cancer associated with wireless phone use, the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified radio electromagnetic fields as possibly carcinogenic to humans.

The European Commission Scientific Committee on Emerging and Newly Identified Health Risks concurred that low-frequency EMFs are “possibly carcinogenic” based on evidence of increased incidence of childhood leukemia and Alzheimer’s disease in adults.

EMF exposure can also lead to electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS), which is a phenomenon characterized by the appearance of symptoms after exposure to EMFs.

Symptoms range from both acute to chronic inflammatory processes across multiple organ systems, but mainly appear in the skin or nervous system. For instance, fatigue, dizziness, headaches, problems with concentrating or memory, depression, burning sensation of the skin, and sleep disturbances are common symptoms among the EHS population.

Given the current research, it’s plausible that reducing man-made EMF exposure can improve health and wellness, especially in sensitive populations. Various strategies for EMF mitigation are available, such as shielding and distancing. However, one often overlooked strategy involves herbs and spices.

Due to the numerous antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds contained in herbs and spices, they can help the body heal from the damage caused by man-made EMF exposure. By learning how to harness the healing power of herbs, we can become more resilient in the face of ever-growing EMF exposure.

Always consult your health care provider before consuming herbs or supplements or making any changes to your medications or medical protocols.

Here’s a list of herbs and spices that have been studied for their potential EMF-protecting ability.

Turmeric

Epoch Times Photo
Turmeric contains anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory effects. (Shutterstock)

Turmeric has been used for thousands of years in traditional medicine, especially for treating inflammatory conditions. A 2021 review published in Biofactors analyzed previous studies and confirmed that turmeric contains anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory effects and can be used for treating “inflammatory, oxidative, and immune dysregulation disorders.”

Turmeric is also a powerful anti-radiation herb partly due to its ability to reduce inflammation. Curcumin, a compound found in turmeric, likely plays a primary role in the ability of turmeric to inhibit inflammation and prevent damage triggered by EMF exposure.

EMF exposure can increase the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1beta. Those pro-inflammatory cytokines can contribute to the formation of neurological conditions and diseases. According to a study published in the Journal of Neuroinflammation, curcumin can inhibit the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines following exposure to EMF radiation.

A study published in the Journal of Chemical Neuroanatomy in 2022 reported that EMFs emitted by mobile phones for one hour per day for 28 days significantly decreased the total number of neurons in the hippocampus of rats compared with the control group. The neuronal structure was also negatively altered. However, curcumin provided “significant protection” against EMF-mediated damage, according to the authors.

These studies suggest that the consumption of turmeric might reduce the negative effects of man-made EMF radiation on the body.

Turmeric can be consumed through food and is often found in Indian dishes such as curry, although it’s great in soups, stews, and hundreds of other dishes. Turmeric root can be added to meals such as salads. Turmeric powder can be added to smoothies and sauces and sprinkled on top of vegetables. Turmeric supplements are also widely available.

CAUTION: Turmeric supplements shouldn’t be consumed during pregnancy. Turmeric is a blood thinner and may interfere with blood thinning medications. Individuals with iron deficiency, diabetes, gallbladder issues, blood clotting issues, or endometriosis should ask their health care practitioner prior to consuming turmeric. 

Ginkgo Biloba

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Gingko Biloba has been identified to have at least 50 distinct beneficial physiological actions. (Ginkgo Biloba/Shutterstock)

Gingko biloba comes from the ginkgo tree, which is thought to be one of the oldest living tree species. Gingko biloba was used in ancient Chinese medicine to help unblock stuck energy in vital organs and to stimulate blood flow throughout the body.

Today, ginkgo is used to soothe headaches, assist with breathing issues, fight depression and anxiety, protect against free radicals, assist with diabetes, and protect the brain from the aging process due to its rich antioxidant properties.

Ginkgo may also protect against EMF radiation. In one study published in the International Journal of Clinical Chemistry, rats were exposed to EMFs from a mobile phone for one hour each day for seven days. EMF exposure resulted in oxidative damage to the brains of rats in the control group.

However, rats given ginkgo biloba prior to cell phone exposure didn’t suffer from oxidative stress. The authors concluded that ginkgo biloba “prevented” the brain tissue from being damaged by EMF exposure.

Ginkgo biloba can be consumed as a tea, tincture, leaf extract, roasted seeds, or in tablet form.

CAUTION: Ginkgo biloba has antiplatelet activity and may potentiate other anticoagulants. Consult with a health care provider prior to consumption. Fresh ginkgo biloba seeds in raw form may be poisonous and can be considered unsafe to eat. Women who are pregnant or nursing should consult with their health care provider before consuming ginkgo.

Ginseng

ginseng
Fresh ginseng. Ginseng has anti-cancer and neuroprotective properties.  (Shutterstock)

Ginseng is an adaptogen that has been utilized in Chinese medicine for its wide spectrum of medicinal effects, including anti-aging and antimutagenic activities.

Recently, studies have verified ginseng’s numerous health benefits, including anti-cancer and neuroprotective properties, as well as pharmacological abilities in the treatment of diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Ginseng may also protect against radiation exposure. A study published in 2014 demonstrated that when rats were exposed to cell phone radiation for four hours per day for 12 days, liver cells were damaged and oxidative injury was observed. However, liver cells weren’t damaged in rats that were administered ginseng.

A study published in BioMed Research International reported a neuroprotective effect of ginseng in the hippocampus of mice following EMF exposure. After one month of exposure to EMFs, brain damage was observed in the control group with a loss of calcium balance in the cells. However, mice administered ginseng were protected against brain impairment and retained calcium balance in the cells of the hippocampus.

A review study published in Mutagenesis reported that ginseng also provides protection against gamma radiation-induced DNA damage. The authors theorized that ginseng’s radioprotective potential may be due to its antioxidative capability to scavenge free radicals, as well as its immunomodulating capabilities.

Ginseng can be consumed as a tea, tincture, extract, or in a supplement form often in capsules.

CATION: Ginseng may interact with certain prescription medications. Both Asian and American ginseng may interact with blood-thinning medications. Asian ginseng may also interact with calcium channel blockers and other medications used for high blood pressure as well as statins, antidepressants, and chemotherapy. Women who are pregnant or nursing should consult with their health care provider before consuming ginseng.

Green Tea

Epoch Times Photo
Green tea ahs anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiarthritic, antibacterial, and antiviral effects. (Thinkstock)

Green tea has been used for treating numerous ailments in traditional Asian medicine. It’s possibly best known for its abundance of antioxidants.

Studies have confirmed numerous health benefits of green tea including prevention of cancer and cardiovascular disease, as well as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiarthritic, antibacterial, and antiviral effects.

Green tea may protect against EMF exposure as well.

A 2011 study published in Neurotoxicity Research reported that green tea can protect neurons in the brain against cell phone radiation. Cell phone exposure for 24 hours resulted in neuronal cell death in cultured rat cells. Green tea, however, prevented cell death.

“Our results suggested a neuroprotective effect of green tea polyphenols against the mobile phone irradiation-induced injury on the cultured rat cortical neurons,” the authors wrote.

A second study published in 2016 in Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology was based on a randomized controlled trial. It reported a protective effect of green tea on workers exposed to low-frequency electromagnetic fields of high-voltage power lines. Oxidative damage to DNA was measured in workers exposed to the EMFs from high-voltage power lines. Following 12 months of green tea polyphenol supplementation (GTPS), the oxidative damage was diminished.

“We found a negative impact of high-voltage power lines on the health of workers,” the authors wrote. “Long-term GTPS could be an efficient protection against the health issues induced by high-voltage power lines.”

Green tea can be consumed as a tea, extract, or in supplemental form such as capsules.

CAUTION: Individuals with any of the following conditions should speak with their health care provider before consuming green tea: anemia, anxiety disorder, a blood-clotting disorder, heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, glaucoma, irritable bowel syndrome, liver disease, or osteoporosis. Women who are pregnant or nursing should consult with their health care provider before consuming green tea.

Polygonum Aviculare

Knotweed,Or,Polygonum,Aviculare,Isolated,On,White,Background
Polygonum Avicularecontains phenolics and flavonoids that impart antioxidant and antitumor properties.(Shutterstock)

A herb used by traditional healers for the treatment of cancer, polygonum aviculare contains phenolics and flavonoids that impart antioxidant and antitumor properties. Consequently, it’s studied for its potential to treat diseases associated with aging.

Polygonum aviculare, more popularly known as common knotgrass, may also protect against damage from EMF exposure.

Exposure to radiofrequency EMFs, such as that produced by laptops and cell phones, has reportedly led to reduced sperm motility and development. A study published in 2011 reported a protective effect of Polygonum aviculare following EMF exposure in mice.

Following two months of EMF exposure, sperm motility was reduced and morphology was impaired. However, in mice supplemented with the herbal extract, sperm motility and development were preserved.

The young leaves of Polygonum aviculare can be consumed raw or cooked, as well as dried and consumed in tea. The seeds can also be consumed either whole or dried and ground into a powder to be used in baking. Supplemental forms, such as capsules, are also available.

Caution: An individual who’s consuming prescription medications or is pregnant or nursing should consult with their health care provider before consuming Polygonum aviculare. 

Rosemary

Epoch Times Photo
Rosemary is a highly versatile herb that can be used in teas, essential oils, and everyday cooking. It is also an effective therapeutic with several uses. (ShutterStock)

The use of rosemary dates back to at least 500 B.C. It was traditionally used for relief from diverse conditions ranging from mental decline to epilepsy, pain, and infertility.

Today, rosemary is studied for its potential to alleviate inflammatory conditions and neurological deficits. It may also protect the body from potential damage caused by EMF exposure.

Exposure to EMFs decreased levels of male hormones in rats, including testosterone, according to a study published in Environmental Science and Pollution Research in 2020. However, male hormone levels in rats supplemented with rosemary leaf extract were improved. In addition, rosemary “inhibited the destructive effect of electromagnetic fields on testicular tissue,” according to the authors.

In 2021, another study published in the Environmental Science and Pollution Research concluded that rosemary leaf extract “offered substantial protection” against EMF-induced liver damage in rats.

Rosemary can be consumed in food in either fresh or dried form, as well as an extract.

CAUTION: Individuals with the following conditions should speak with their health care provider before consuming rosemary: gastroenteritis, endometriosis, constipation, epilepsy, neurodegenerative disease, and insomnia. Women who are pregnant or nursing should consult with their health care provider before consuming rosemary.

Holy Basil

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Holy basil has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, antistress, anti-carcinogenic, radioprotective, neuro-protective, cardio-protective, hepatoprotective, and immunomodulatory activities. (Infinity T29/Shutterstock)

Not to be confused with sweet basil that’s commonly used to make pesto, the medicinal properties of holy basil have been known for thousands of years, and the herb is considered sacred by the Hindus in the Indian subcontinent.

Holy basil has been shown scientifically to exhibit anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, antistress, anti-carcinogenic, radioprotective, neuro-protective, cardio-protective, hepatoprotective, and immunomodulatory activities.

Holy Basil is an adaptogen that supports the body’s endogenous antioxidant activity to help combat oxidative stress. For example, it contains numerous phytochemicals such as rosmarinic acid, eugenol, apigenin, and carnosic acid.

These compounds reportedly prevent chemical-induced skin, liver, oral, and lung cancers by increasing antioxidant activity, altering gene expression including upregulation of apoptosis, and inhibiting metastasis. They also prevent radiation-induced DNA damage.

Likewise, Holy Basil contains flavonoids, such as orintin and vicenin, which have reportedly protected mice against gamma radiation-induced sickness and death.

Due to its ability to boost antioxidant capacity, decrease oxidative stress, and protect against gamma radiation sickness, it’s plausible holy basil might help protect the body from EMFs as well.

Holy Basil leaves can be consumed in foods. They have a spicy, lemony flavor and are used in foods in Southeast Asia, such as in Thai stir-fried dishes.

CAUTION: Holy basil shouldn’t be consumed by individuals on blood-thinning medications or who have low blood sugar. Women who are pregnant or trying to conceive shouldn’t consume holy basil. 

Ashwagandha

Ashwagandha root
Ashwagandha has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immune-modulating, anti-stress, anti-Parkinson, anti-Alzheimer, anti-diabetic, cardioprotective, neurodefensive, and anti-cancer properties.(Eskymaks/Shutterstock)

 

Possibly the world’s most popular adaptogen, ashwagandha has been used since antiquity for reproductive health and is currently used for a variety of ailments from relieving anxiety to increasing longevity.

Scientific studies confirm ashwagandha contains antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, immune-modulating, anti-stress, anti-Parkinson, anti-Alzheimer, anti-diabetic, cardioprotective, neurodefensive, and anti-cancer properties.

For instance, ashwagandha inhibited metastasis of breast cancer in rats with minimal adverse effects, according to a study published in the Public Library of Science. It has also been reported to mitigate undesirable side effects of gamma radiation therapy by protecting the liver from damage and increasing antioxidant capacity in rats.

Ashwagandha’s powerful protective properties may be due, in part, to its ability to boost antioxidant capacity and combat oxidative stress. For instance, ashwagandha has been used for several thousand years in Ayurvedic medicine to treat numerous neurological disorders. A recent systematic review of the scientific literature concluded that ashwagandha protects the brain from oxidative stress.

Since ashwagandha contains powerful antioxidant properties and can protect against oxidative stress caused by physical and chemical stressors, such as radiation, it’s plausible ashwagandha may protect against other forms of radiation as well, including radiofrequency EMFs.

Ashwagandha can be consumed as a tea, tincture, powder, or supplement.

Caution: Pregnant women shouldn’t consume ashwagandha. Ashwagandha can lower blood pressure and blood sugar and elevate thyroid hormone levels. Speak with your health care practitioner prior to consumption. 

Reishi Mushroom

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Reishi mushroom has many health benefits, such as preventing and reversing cancer, boosting the immune system, and reducing fatigue. (wasanajai/Shutterstock)

 

While technically a fungus rather than a herb, Reishi mushroom has many health benefits, such as preventing and reversing cancer, boosting the immune system, and reducing fatigue.

Reishi may also provide protection from EMF radiation. A study published in Food Chemistry in 2010 reported that reishi repaired cells that were damaged by gamma radiation. The authors concluded that the use of reishi “is a promising approach for protection from radiation exposure.”

Reishi extract has also been shown to suppress inflammation, scavenge free radicals, and decrease oxidative damage.

Due to its ability to decrease oxidative stress and repair cells damaged by gamma radiation, it’s plausible reishi might help protect the body from radiofrequency electromagnetic fields as well.

Reishi can be consumed as a whole mushroom as well as in a tea, tincture, or extract.

Caution: Reishi mushrooms can cause dizziness, dry mouth, itching, nausea, stomach upset, and rash. Individuals with bleeding disorders or low blood pressure, as well as women who are pregnant or breastfeeding, should consult with their health care provider before consuming reishi. Individuals that will be undergoing surgery shouldn’t consume reishi.  

As these examples can attest, herbs and spices (and mushrooms) can help protect us from potential damage caused by exposure to man-made EMFs. If we can learn to harness their power, herbs and spices can help us become more resilient—even when faced with growing exposure to radiation.

Sina McCullough

Sina McCullough is the creator of the online program, “GO WILD: How I Reverse Chronic & Autoimmune Disease,” and author of Hands Off My Food,” and “Beyond Labels.” She earned a Ph.D. in Nutrition from UC Davis. She is a Master Herbalist, Gluten Free Society Certified Practitioner and homeschool mom of three.

Spike Protein Detox Guide

World Council for Health

Spike Protein Detox Guide

About this guide

This is an evolving guide with emerging information on how to clear viral and vaccine-induced spike proteins from the body. The lists of herbal and other medicines and supplements have been compiled in a collaboration between international doctors, scientists, and holistic medical practitioners.

As Covid-19 infections, Covid-19 vaccines, and the issue of spike protein harms are new, this guide is informed by established and emerging medical research as well as the clinical experience of international medical doctors and holistic health practitioners; it will evolve as new evidence emerges.

The patent-free medicines and supplements included may have differing availability around the world.

Who might benefit from this information?

If you have had Covid-19, have recently had a Covid-19 injection, or are experiencing symptoms that may be related to Covid-19 vaccine transmission (also called shedding), you may benefit from using one or more items from our list of medicines and supplements to reduce spike protein load. The spike protein, which is both a part of the Covid-19 virus and is produced in our bodies after inoculation, can circulate around our bodies causing damage to cells, tissues, and organs.

Many people have been unable to find help for spike protein related illness (also called spikopathy) through existing healthcare services. This information is relevant if you have experienced adverse reactions after a jab, have Long Covid, or have post Covid-Injection Syndrome (pCoIS).

Important Note: This guide is for education only. If you are ill after vaccination, please seek help from a medical doctor or an holistic health practitioner. For information on post Covid-injection illnesses, see the WCH post-injection guide

The spike protein can be found in all SARS-CoV-2 variants. It is also produced in your body when you get a Covid-19 injection. Even if you have not had any symptoms, tested positive for Covid-19, or experienced adverse side effects after a jab, there may still be lingering spike proteins inside your body. In order to clear these after the jab or an infection, doctors and holistic practitioners are suggesting a few simple actions.

It is thought that cleansing the body of spike protein (referred to as a detox from here on) as soon as possible after an infection or jab may protect against damage from remaining or circulating spike proteins.

In this guide, we will discuss several key features of these conditions that can be targeted during a detox:

  • The spike protein
  • ACE2 receptors
  • Interleukin 6 (IL-6)
  • Furin
  • Serine protease

Important Safety Information Before Beginning a Detox

Please do not undertake a spike protein detox without supervision from your trusted health practitioner. Please note the following:

  • Pine needle tea, neem, comfrey, Andrographis paniculata –  Should NOT be consumed during pregnancy.
  • Magnesium –  Overdosing is possible, and it is more difficult to detect when consuming liposomal magnesium. Therefore, consider a mixture of liposomal and conventional magnesium, or just conventional magnesium.
  • Zinc – When consuming a multivitamin that already includes zinc, be sure to adjust the quantity of zinc consumed in other supplements.
  • Nattokinase – Do not take while using blood thinners or if you are pregnant or nursing.
  • Always consider dosing – When taking a multivitamin, remember to adjust the amount of individual supplements accordingly. (e.g. If your multivitamin contains 15mg of zinc, you should reduce your zinc supplementation by that amount.)
  • St John’s Wort – This medicine interacts with many pharmaceutical drugs. It should not be taken if you are on other medication without advice from your doctor.

Proactive and supportive measures

Virtually all conditions are more easily managed in their early stages. After all, it is certainly preferable to avert a health crisis entirely than it is to react to one. As the saying goes, an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. 

A healthy diet is vital to support a healthy immune system. 

Tips

  • Alter your diet so as to reduce consumption of pro-inflammatory food items. A low histamine diet is recommended. Avoid processed foods and GMOs.
  • The food items found in Table 1 may also be incorporated into daily diets prior to contracting Covid-19 or receiving a Covid-19 jab, if you still choose to do so.
  • Intermittent fasting: The practice of intermittent fasting involves implementing meal timing schedules that switch back and forth between periods of voluntary fasting and non-fasting. Commonly, those who practice intermittent fasting consume all of their daily calories within 6-8 hours each day. This method of dieting is used to induce autophagy, which is essentially a recycling process that takes place in human cells, where cells degrade and recycle components. Autophagy is used by the body to eliminate damaged cell proteins and can destroy harmful viruses and bacteria post-infection.
  • Daily consumption of a multivitamin is advised. It provides a basic supply of vitamin A, vitamin E, iodine, selenium, trace elements, and more in addition to vitamin C and vitamin D3.
  • Heat therapy, such as taking saunas and hot baths, are considered a good way of detoxing spike protein.

What is the spike protein?

The SARS-CoV-2 virus contains a spike protein on its surface. If you’ve seen images of the coronavirus, it is the sun-like protrusions often pictured on the outside of the virus.

During a natural infection, spike proteins play a key role in helping the virus enter the cells of your body. A region of the protein, known as the S2, fuses the viral envelope to your cell membrane. The S2 region also allows for the coronavirus spike protein to be easily detected by the immune system, which then makes antibodies to target and bind the virus.

Spike proteins are also produced by your body after taking a Covid-19 jab, and they function similarly in that they are able to fuse to cell membranes. In addition, since they are made in your own cells, your cells are then targeted by your immune system in an effort to destroy the spike protein. Thus, your immune system’s response to spike proteins can damage your body’s cells.

spike protein detox guide
spike protein detox guide

Emerging evidence is also showing that in the nucleus of our cells the spike protein impairs our cells’ ability to repair DNA.

Why should I consider detoxing from the spike protein?

The spike protein from a natural infection or a Covid vaccine causes damage to our body’s cells, so it is important to take action to detoxify from it as best as we are able.

The spike protein is a highly toxic part of the virus, and research has linked the vaccine-induced spike protein to toxic effects. Spike protein research is ongoing.

The virus spike protein has been linked to adverse effects, such as: blood clots, brain fog, organising pneumonia, and myocarditis. It is probably responsible for many of the Covid-19 vaccine side effects discussed in the WCH post-injection guide.

A Japanese biodistribution study for the Pfizer vaccine found that, in the 48 hours post-vaccination, vaccine particles had travelled to various tissues throughout the body and did not stay at the injection site, with high concentrations found at the liver, bone marrow, and ovaries.

Emerging evidence on spikopathy suggests that effects related to inflammation and clotting may occur in any tissue in which the spike protein accumulates. In addition, peer-reviewed studies in mice have found that the spike protein is capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier. Thus, in humans it could potentially lead to neurological damage if it is not cleared from the body.

How to reduce your spike protein load

Supporting people with Long Covid and post vaccine illness is a new and emerging field of health research and practice. The following lists contain substances that may be useful. This list has been compiled by international doctors and holistic practitioners with diverse experiences in helping people recover from Covid-19 and post injection illness.

Luckily, there are a host of easily attainable, natural solutions to reduce your body’s spike protein load.

Some “Protein Binding Inhibitors” inhibit the binding of the spike protein to human cells, while others neutralize the spike protein so that it can no longer cause damage to human cells.

Spike Protein Inhibitors: Prunella vulgaris, pine needles, emodin, neem, dandelion leaf extract, ivermectin

Spike Protein Neutralizers: N-acetylcysteine (NAC), glutathione, fennel tea, star anise tea, pine needle tea, St. John’s wort, comfrey leaf, vitamin C

  • Ivermectin has been shown to bind to the spike protein, potentially rendering it ineffective in binding to the cell membrane.
  • Several plants found in nature, including pine needles, fennel, star anise, St. John’s wort, and comfrey leaf, contain a substance called shikimic acid, which may help to neutralize the spike protein. Shikimic acid may help to reduce several possible damaging effects of the spike protein, and is believed to counteract blood clot formation.
  • Regular oral doses of vitamin C are useful in neutralizing any toxin.
  • Pine needle tea has powerful antioxidant effects and contain high concentrations of vitamin C.
  • Nattokinase (see Table 1), an enzyme derived from the Japanese soybean dish ‘Natto’, is a natural substance whose properties may help to reduce the occurrence of blood clots.

What is the ACE2 receptor?

The ACE2 receptor is located in the cell wall, in lung and blood vessel linings, and in platelets. Spike protein attaches to ACE2 receptors.

It has been proposed that large concentrations of spike protein may bind to our ACE2 receptors and effectively ‘sit there’, blocking the regular functioning of these receptors in various tissues. The disruption of these receptors has been associated with a multitude of adverse effects through altered tissue functioning.

  • If spike proteins bind to the cell wall and ‘stay put’, they could trigger the immune system to attack healthy cells and possibly trigger autoimmune disease.
  • The spike protein could attach to ACE2 receptors located on blood platelets and the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels, which may lead to abnormal bleeding or clotting, both of which are linked to Vaccine-induced Thrombotic Thrombocytopenia (VITT)

How to detox your ACE2 receptors

Substances that naturally protect the ACE2 receptors:

  • Ivermectin
  • Hydroxychloroquine (with zinc)
  • Quercetin (with zinc)
  • Fisetin

Evidence suggests the binding of ivermectin to the ACE2 receptor prevents the spike protein from binding with it instead.

What is Interleukin-6?

Interleukin 6, or IL-6, is a primarily pro-inflammatory cytokine protein. This means it is naturally produced by the body in response to infection or tissue damage and initiates the inflammatory response.

Why target IL-6?

Some natural substances help the post-jab detoxification process by targeting Interleukin 6.

Scientific evidence shows that cytokines such as IL-6, are found in far higher levels among those infected with Covid when compared to uninfected individuals.

IL-6 has been used as a biomarker for Covid progression. Increased levels of IL-6 have been found in patients with respiratory dysfunction. Meta-analysis has revealed a reliable relationship between IL-6 levels and covid severity. IL-6 levels have been inversely related with T-cell count in ICU patients.

Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6 are also expressed post-vaccination, and studies suggest that they may reach the brain.

Il-6 inhibitors have in fact been recommended by the WHO for severe Covid cases, for which they have been described as life-saving.

How to detox from IL-6

The following lists of natural substances, including several basic anti-inflammatory food supplements, can be used to prevent the adverse effects of IL-6 by inhibiting its action.

IL-6 Inhibitors (anti-inflammatories): Boswellia serrata (frankincense) and dandelion leaf extract

Other IL-6 inhibitors: Black cumin (Nigella sativa), curcumin, fish oil and other fatty acids, cinnamon, fisetin (flavonoid), apigenin, quercetin (flavonoid), resveratrol, luteolin, vitamin D3 (with vitamin K), zinc, magnesium, jasmine tea, spices, bay leaves, black pepper, nutmeg, and sage

What is furin?

Furin is an enzyme, which cleaves proteins and makes them biologically activate.

Why target furin?

Furin has been shown to separate the spike protein and thus allow the virus to enter human cells.

A furin cleavage site is present on the Covid spike protein, which is thought to make the virus more infectious and transmissible.

Furin inhibitors work by preventing cleavage of the spike protein.

How to detox from furin

Substances that naturally inhibit furin:

  • Rutin
  • Limonene
  • Baicalein
  • Hesperidin

What is serine protease?

Serine protease is an enzyme.

Why target serine protease?

Inhibiting serine protease can prevent spike protein activation and also reduce viral entry to cells, hence reducing infection rate as well as severity.

How to detox from serine protease

Substances that naturally inhibit serine protease and may help to reduce spike protein levels in the body:

  • Green tea
  • Potato tubers
  • Blue green algae
  • Soybeans
  • N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC)
  • Boswellia (frankincense)

What to Take? How much to take? Where does it come from? Where to get it?

Table 1. Medicines and supplements that can be considered
Substance Natural Source(s) Where to Get Recommended Dose
Ivermectin Soil bacteria (avermectin) On prescription 0.4mg/kg weekly for 4 weeks, then monthly
*Check package instructions to determine if there are contraindications prior to use
Hydroxychloroquine On prescription 200mg weekly for 4 weeks *Check package instructions to determine if there are contraindications prior to use
Vitamin C Citrus fruits (e.g. oranges) and vegetables (broccoli, cauliflower, brussel sprouts) Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online 6-12g daily (divided evenly between sodium ascorbate (several grams), liposomal vitamin C (3-6g) & ascorbyl palmitate (1 – 3g)
Prunella Vulgaris (commonly known as self-heal) Self-heal plant Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online 7 ounces (207ml) daily
Pine Needles Pine tree Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online Consume tea 3 x daily (consume oil/resin that accumulates in the tea also)
Neem Neem tree Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online As per your practitioner’s or preparation instructions
Dandelion Leaf Extract Dandelion plant Supplement (dandelion tea, dandelion coffee, leaf tincture): natural food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online Tincture as per your practitioner’s or preparation instructions
N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC) High-protein foods (beans, lentils, spinach, bananas, salmon, tuna) Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online Up to 1200mg daily (in divided doses)
Fennel Tea Fennel plant Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online No upper limit. Start with 1 cup and monitor body’s reaction.
Star Anise Tea Chinese evergreen tree (Illicium verum) Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online No upper limit. Start with 1 cup and monitor body’s reaction.
St John’s Wort St John’s wort plant Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online As directed on supplement
Comfrey Leaf Symphytum plant genus Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online As directed on supplement
Nattokinase Natto (Japanese soybean dish) Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online As directed on supplement
Boswellia serrata Boswellia serrata tree Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online As directed on supplement
Black Cumin (Nigella Sativa) Buttercup plant family Grocery stores, health food stores
Curcumin Turmeric Grocery stores, health food stores
Fish Oil Fatty/oily fish Grocery stores, health food stores Up to 2000mg daily
Cinnamon Cinnamomum tree genus Grocery store
Fisetin (Flavonoid) Fruits: strawberries, apples, mangoes Vegetables: onions, nuts, wine Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online Up to 100mg daily (Consume with fats)
Apigenin Fruits, veg & herbs parsley, chamomile, vine-spinach, celery, artichokes, oregano Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online 50mg daily
Quercetin (Flavonoid) Citrus fruits, onions, parsley, red wine Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online Up to 500mg twice daily, Consume with Zinc
Resveratrol Peanuts, grapes, wine, blueberries, cocoa Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online Up to 1500mg daily for up to 3 months
Luteolin Vegetables: celery, parsley, onion leaves
Fruits: apple skins, chrysanthemum flowers
Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online 100-300mg daily (Typical manufacturer recommendations)
Vitamin D3 Fatty fish, fish liver oils Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online 5000 – 10,000 IU daily 
Vitamin K Green leafy vegetables Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online 90-120mg daily  (90 for women, 120 for men)
Zinc Red meat, poultry, oysters, whole grains, milk products Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online 11-40mg daily
Magnesium Greens, whole grains, nuts Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online Up to 350mg daily 
Jasmine Tea Leaves of common jasmine or Sampaguita plants Grocery store, health food stores Up to 8 cups per day
Spices Grocery store
Bay Leaves Bay leaf plants Grocery store
Black Pepper Piper nigrum plant Grocery store
Nutmeg Myristica fragrans tree seed Grocery store
Sage Sage plant Grocery store
Rutin Buckwheat, asparagus, apricots, cherries, black tea, green tea, elderflower tea Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online 500-4000mg daily  (consult healthcare provider before taking higher-end doses)
Limonene Rind of citrus fruits such as lemons, oranges, and limes Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online Up to 2000mg daily
Baicalein Scutellaria plant genus Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online 100-2800mg
Hesperidin Citrus fruit Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online Up to 150mg twice daily
Green Tea Camellia sinensis plant leaves Grocery store Up to 8 cups of tea a day or as directed on supplement
Potatoes tubers Potatoes Grocery store
Blue Green Algae Cyanobacteria Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online 1-10 grams daily
Andrographis Paniculata Green chiretta plant Supplement: health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online 400mg x 2 daily

*Check for contradictions

Milk Thistle Extract Silymarin Supplement; Health food stores, pharmacies, dietary supplement stores, online 200mg x 3 daily
Soybeans (organic) Soybeans Grocery store, health food stores

Most of these items are easily accessible in local grocery stores or as nutritional supplements in health food stores.

Note: This list is not comprehensive and other substances, such as serrapeptase and CBD oil, have also been suggested. The World Council for Health will continue to update this document as new information emerges.

Some holistic practitioners also recommend substances to cleanse the body of metals after vaccination, such as zeolite and activated charcoal. The WCH will prepare guidance on how to detox from metals in due course.

Top ten spike protein detox essentials:

  • Vitamin D
  • Vitamin C
  • NAC (N-acetylcysteine)
  • Ivermectin
  • Nigella seed
  • Quercetin
  • Zinc
  • Magnesium
  • Curcumin
  • Milk thistle extract

For more information and specific protocols, here are a few websites that may be of interest: 

Click here to download a PDF guide from Caring Healthcare Workers Coalition.

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