Graphene Oxide Nanotech in Pfizer Vaccine, Court Allows COVID-19 Vaccine Mandate for NYC Public School Teachers, Staff and Moree

 

German Researchers Found Graphene Oxide Nanotech in Pfizer Vaccine

Share This Article08/16/2021 In corroboration of the Moderna vaccine findings under a microscope reported by American medical researchers, a video with German subtitles exposing drops of the Pfizer vaccine under a microscope has surfaced online; Posted at several channels on Telegram and at Youtube on August 10, 2021, showing an astounding congregation of tiny specks … Continue reading

 

Kindergarten students attend a math lesson at the Milton Elementary School, in Rye, New York, on May 18, 2021. (Mary Altaffer, File/AP Photo)

Court Allows COVID-19 Vaccine Mandate for NYC Public School Teachers, Staff to Take Effect

By Katabella Roberts
September 28, 2021 Updated: September 28, 2021

 

A federal appeals panel on Monday ruled in favor of New York City’s vaccine mandate for teachers and other Department of Education staffers in public schools, just hours before it was scheduled to begin.

Plaintiffs, a group of teachers, had asked for a temporary injunction against the mandate, which requires all workers to show proof that they’ve received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, stating that it violated the U.S. Constitution’s Due Process Clause. That clause states in part that no state can “deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.”

On Sept. 24, a federal judge granted the request to temporarily block it, and a three-judge panel had been scheduled to hear the case this coming Wednesday.

But in a surprise turn of events, the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan issued its ruling Monday evening instead, dissolving the prior injunction without providing any further explanation as to why.

New York City’s Mayor Bill de Blasio said on Monday that Department of Education staff have until 5 p.m. on Oct. 1 to get their first dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, noting that the swift decision also came as a surprise to him.

“If you have not gotten that first dose by Friday, 5 o’clock, we will assume you are not coming to work on Monday and you will not be paid starting Monday and we will fill your role with a substitute or an alternative employee,” the Democrat said.

The decision has prompted concerns that there will soon be a shortage of teaching staff. Some unions have called for a delay.

“The courts have cleared the way for the city to begin enforcing the city’s vaccine mandate for school employees,” the United Federation of Teachers (UFT) President Michael Mulgrew said in a statement following the sudden decision.

“The city’s estimate is that 97 percent of the teachers have been vaccinated, but according to our recent survey of UFT chapter leaders, only about one-third believe that as of now their schools can open without disruption, given the potential shortage of unvaccinated personnel, including school aides and security personnel,” he added. “The city has a lot of work before it to ensure that enough vaccinated staff will be available by the new deadline. We will be working with our members to ensure, as far as possible, that our schools can open safely as the vaccine mandate is enforced.”

Louis Gelormino, an attorney for the UFT, told Fox News he was considering taking the case to the Supreme Court.

“How can laying off or suspending 28,000, and that’s not an exaggerated number, DoE employees not have an effect on the New York City schools, which don’t run very efficiently in the best of times,” he said. “We’re reviewing our options and there’s a good possibility that we might try to take it up to the Supreme Court.”

Katabella Roberts

Katabella Roberts
Katabella Roberts is a reporter currently based in Turkey. She covers news and business for The Epoch Times, focusing primarily on the United States.

 

 

FBI: US Murders Increased by 29.4 Percent in 2020

September 27, 2021 Updated: September 27, 2021

The FBI reported on Sept. 27 that murders rose by 29.4 percent in the United States in 2020 compared to the previous year—one of the largest single-year increases ever recorded in the country’s recorded history.

The federal law enforcement agency’s data show that 21,570 homicides were reported in 2020, which is 4,901 more than in 2019. The overall violent crime rate, including murders, assault, rape, and robbery, was up by about 5 percent, while property crimes decreased by 8 percent in 2020, the data show.

“In 2020, there were an estimated 1,277,696 violent crimes,” the FBI said in a statement. “When compared with the estimates from 2019, the estimated number of robbery offenses fell 9.3 percent and the estimated volume of rape (revised definition) offenses decreased 12.0 percent.

“Nationwide, there were an estimated 6,452,038 property crimes. The estimated numbers for two of the three property crimes showed declines when compared with the previous year’s estimates.”

The FBI also reported that burglaries and larceny-thefts declined by 7.4 percent and 10.6 percent respectively, while motor vehicle thefts rose by 11.8 percent.

Jeff Asher, a data consultant who studies crime, told NPR that the increase in 2020 is the largest since national records starting being kept in the 1960s.

“In the ’90s, New York and Los Angeles accounted for 13.5 percent of all murders nationally. Last year, it was under 4 percent,” he said. “So it’s a lot more diffuse than it was in the ’90s.”

The murder rate was higher in cities with smaller populations—between 10,000 and 250,000 people—than in cities between 250,000 and 1 million, according to FBI data.

“It was up over 30 percent in both, so neither was good, but it was worse slightly, percentage-wise in smaller cities,” Asher said. “It was bad everywhere. There’s not a good murder takeaway there.”

James Alan Fox, a professor of criminology at Northeastern University, told USA Today that 2020’s murder spike might not indicate a long-term trend.

“Last year was unique in many ways,” Fox said. “Because of the pandemic, people were not in structured activities: Kids were not in school and adults were not at work. The whole country was divided by politics, the response to the coronavirus, and the social justice movement.”

Some police groups have said that the rise in crime can be at least partially attributed to the anti-police animus that arose during Black Lives Matter protests and riots in 2020, sparked by George Floyd’s death. In late June, the National Fraternal Order of Police (NFOP) tied the associated “defund the police” movement to a rise in homicides nationwide.

The mayors of some cities need to “restore the rule of law” and “oppose rogue District Attorneys not prosecuting violent crime” that allow criminals to “roam free,” the group wrote on Twitter. NFOP Vice President Joe Gamaldi told the Daily Caller around the same time that lax bail, or bail reform, is allowing suspected violent offenders back into society.

The Department of Justice announced earlier in 2021 that it would establish special task forces to focus on firearm trafficking across the United States, including New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, the California Bay Area, Sacramento, and Washington.

Jack Phillips

Jack Phillips
SENIOR REPORTER
Jack Phillips is a reporter at The Epoch Times based in New York.
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